On the Run: fitness made simple

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Posts tagged running

90 notes

Kaiser San Francisco Half Marathon 
After fourteen months since my last race, 3 months of training, and one big nudge out the door on a rainy race day, I achieved a PR of 1:47:23 (8:12 per mile). I’m ready to retire these shoes. 
The Goal: Run around 8:30/mile and to finish strong. 
The Race:
Overall strategy: Easy beginning, relaxed and quicker middle, and surge for the last 2 miles.  
1-3 miles: Take it easy and run about 5 seconds slower than my goal pace. That didn’t happen…I ended up running around 8:05/mile. For these 3 miles, EVERYONE was passing me. Literally 1000 people passed me. 
3-8 miles: Relax and run at my goal race (8:15/mile). As I got to mile 8, the winner passed me on the other side of the switchback at mile 12! He was 4+ miles ahead of me! Craziness. The winning times were 1:08 something. 
8-11 miles: These were the hardest because you aren’t super close to the end yet, but have still run pretty far. Also, it was windy and cold along the beach. It gets mentally tiring keeping track of your pace and constantly looking at your watch, so I tried to keep up with people I estimated to be running at my desired pace. That way, you let other’s do the pacing work for you =). 
11-13.1 miles: This is where the game begins! I aimed for runners ahead of me and tried to catch up to them. I only successful passed a few people, but this game helped me push through. When I started to slow down, I surged for a few seconds to get my legs back into gear. I thought about Ben at the finish line waiting to congratulate me and give me chocolate (He’s really the best boyfriend of all time).
Post race:  Avocado tartine and fruit for breakfast. Then in the library by 12 noon to study for Step 1 (medical board exam). Looking forward to my recovery days and break from structured running. 
Thank you for all your support and for being here for me to share my story with! I’d love to hear your’s. 
Best,
Geraldine 

Kaiser San Francisco Half Marathon 

After fourteen months since my last race, 3 months of training, and one big nudge out the door on a rainy race day, I achieved a PR of 1:47:23 (8:12 per mile). I’m ready to retire these shoes. 

The Goal: Run around 8:30/mile and to finish strong. 

The Race:

  • Overall strategy: Easy beginning, relaxed and quicker middle, and surge for the last 2 miles.  
  • 1-3 miles: Take it easy and run about 5 seconds slower than my goal pace. That didn’t happen…I ended up running around 8:05/mile. For these 3 miles, EVERYONE was passing me. Literally 1000 people passed me. 
  • 3-8 miles: Relax and run at my goal race (8:15/mile). As I got to mile 8, the winner passed me on the other side of the switchback at mile 12! He was 4+ miles ahead of me! Craziness. The winning times were 1:08 something. 
  • 8-11 miles: These were the hardest because you aren’t super close to the end yet, but have still run pretty far. Also, it was windy and cold along the beach. It gets mentally tiring keeping track of your pace and constantly looking at your watch, so I tried to keep up with people I estimated to be running at my desired pace. That way, you let other’s do the pacing work for you =). 
  • 11-13.1 miles: This is where the game begins! I aimed for runners ahead of me and tried to catch up to them. I only successful passed a few people, but this game helped me push through. When I started to slow down, I surged for a few seconds to get my legs back into gear. I thought about Ben at the finish line waiting to congratulate me and give me chocolate (He’s really the best boyfriend of all time).

Post race:  Avocado tartine and fruit for breakfast. Then in the library by 12 noon to study for Step 1 (medical board exam). Looking forward to my recovery days and break from structured running. 

Thank you for all your support and for being here for me to share my story with! I’d love to hear your’s. 

Best,

Geraldine 

Filed under kphalfmarathon running fitness health exercise personal sanfrancisco kaiser medicalschool allidoisnguyen chocolateyayyy

28 notes

Aug 12-August 18 workout

Monday: Run-45 minutes flat road and long, steep hills

Tuesday: Run- 4x1mile intervals. 7:52, 7:29, 7:35, 7:26 minutes. 

Wednesday: 1 hr swim technique clinic…lots of laps and speedwork today

Thursday: 45 minutes elliptical, NTC: 15 minutes arms, 15 minutes abs 

Friday: Rest (flight to San Diego for a weekend of catching up with friends, family, Vietnamese food, and the beach!) 

Saturday: 7 mile run to the beach with long & steady inclines and declines 

Sunday: 4 mile run (2 miles downhill, 2 miles up hill) around the a beautiful posh neighborhood in Rancho Santa Fe, CA 

I’ve been sick since Thursday. Exercise is a stress on the body so it’s good for the body and mind to rest. You don’t want to make yourself suffer so much when your body aches, you can’t breathe as well, and you get headaches easier than usual. I think I’m going to rest today too and take a 40 minute walk or something. What’s great about rest days is that you can take the time to focus just on your diet. 

Filed under weeklyworkout fitness fitblr exercise healthy running workout plan

16 notes

thinking about running Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Half Marathon...

haha love their facial expressions…so intense yet fake. 

Early registration ends tomorrow…race is February 3rd.

Pros: fee reasonable, close by, some med school peeps will do it, I can run 13.1 miles for sure, donation to Kaiser

Cons: I don’t think I can run a personal best, I am enjoying the variety and flexibility of my workouts, the finisher’s shirt is brown… 

Thinkingggg about it….leaning towards YES…but I don’t feel like following a 1 month training plan… =/ 

Filed under contemplation running half marathon fitness san francisco kaiser

51 notes

blozi asked: Hi, im thinking about running a half or full marathon later this year. I was wondering if you had any advice for someone who to be honest probably could run for fifteen minutes. Thanks

Great New Year’s Resolution! 

So it’s not unpractical to go from NO running to completing a half marathon. I would aim for 13.1 miles first before you tackle the full marathon. You have to decide if you even like running first!

Tips to get you started:

  • Find a training schedule online. There are ones for first-timers! I used one from http://www.runnersworld.com/training-plans/half-marathon-training-plans 
  • Sign up for a half-marathon.
  • Read about proper running form. 
  • Commit to running/working out at certain times throughout the week. 
  • Prepare for a change in appetite. If more running, some people find that their appetite decreases, so you should take note if you are eating enough. Others (like myself) tend to get hungrier and overeat! It helps me to track my food and calories when I’m training for a race to help me not overeat. It is good to eat more  when you’re running a lot though. I’d say eat back 75% of the calories you burn.
  • Educate yourself about running routes in your neighborhood. 
  • Stretch and warm-up to avoid injury. Shin splints are common in new runners, but they can be mended through calf stretching and changing running terrain.
  • Eat Breakfast! 
  • Have fun and enjoy the time you have to think, to daydream, and to do something entirely for yourself!

What are some tips everyone else has?

Happy New Year! 

-Geraldine

Filed under ask running advice

15 notes

Anonymous asked: It's concerning to me that you feel like you need to run a marathon to justify eating a blueberry muffin.

Honestly, I rarely (almost never) eat an entire 400+ calorie muffin…but I like to make lower calorie versions of pumpkin and banana breads when I get a craving! Substituting applesauce for butter is AH-MAZING. Whoever came up with that is a genius. My favorite bread right now is a chocolate-cherry sourdough loaf from a local San Francisco bakery! It’s quite dense, so I try and only have a chunk for dessert and I don’t buy it every week. My goal right now is to not eat like I’m training for a marathon still…I’m always striving for moderation =) Sometimes you just need the real deal though you know?

Also, I wanted to share this message with you all in case anyone was thinking the same thing. I hope not! Don’t worry about me…I’m doing fine health-wise in med school! I’ll try and be more sensitive in my posts, but I tend to be kind of sarcastic and use exaggerations as humor.  

Filed under blogging fitness marathon running diet

17 notes

My one of my awesome roommates, Jo, welcomed me home!!! 
I didn’t have anyone cheering for me or waiting for me this time…but when I got home, I saw this banner and I was so excited! My roommates (plus Larry) in medical school were so supportive of me during my training…always reassuring that I’d do great even when I was doubting myself when I was hurting. Jo bought me a celebratory muffin and we shared mango sticky rice for dessert =). She asked me what I wanted to eat, and I thought…if there was any day for a giant blueberry muffin…it’s marathon day! 
My second roommate, Sheen, was planning on even waiting for me at the finish line with banners (you’ll see posts about our fitness fiascos soon). She had plans last minute. But, honestly it’s the thought that counts…especially since we’re all med students and I know how busy she is with school, family, and personal relationships. It meant so much. 
"Just Did It" ;-) 

My one of my awesome roommates, Jo, welcomed me home!!! 

I didn’t have anyone cheering for me or waiting for me this time…but when I got home, I saw this banner and I was so excited! My roommates (plus Larry) in medical school were so supportive of me during my training…always reassuring that I’d do great even when I was doubting myself when I was hurting. Jo bought me a celebratory muffin and we shared mango sticky rice for dessert =). She asked me what I wanted to eat, and I thought…if there was any day for a giant blueberry muffin…it’s marathon day! 

My second roommate, Sheen, was planning on even waiting for me at the finish line with banners (you’ll see posts about our fitness fiascos soon). She had plans last minute. But, honestly it’s the thought that counts…especially since we’re all med students and I know how busy she is with school, family, and personal relationships. It meant so much. 

"Just Did It" ;-) 

Filed under personal nike NWM running

31 notes

Got my little blue Tiffany’s box from firefighters at the finish line! Okay so not all of them are hot…But nice that they are volunteering their time! 
I told my roommate who’s thoughtful boyfriend surprised her with a beautiful Tiffany’s bracelet for their anniversary that some girls have to run 26.2 miles for a taste of Tiffany’s haha.

Got my little blue Tiffany’s box from firefighters at the finish line! Okay so not all of them are hot…But nice that they are volunteering their time! 

I told my roommate who’s thoughtful boyfriend surprised her with a beautiful Tiffany’s bracelet for their anniversary that some girls have to run 26.2 miles for a taste of Tiffany’s haha.

Filed under nike running firefighters tiffany's marathon NWM

46 notes

Nike Women’s Marathon, San Francisco (10-14-12)
The crowds of people, the challenges that lay ahead, the possibility that anything can happen may overwhelm an amateur runner as she enters her start carrel. However, once you start running, you realize that this race is ultimately about you. No one else knows the injuries, the sacrifices, the family issues that you’ve dealt with in order to be present at the starting line on race day. The way I see it, making it to the starting line in one piece is a bigger accomplishment than crossing the finish line. For me, the Nike Women’s Full Marathon (NWM) was not only an athletic win, but also an emotional achievement.
I went into this race without any expectations. My right IT band and knee have been hurting on-and-off since the San Francisco Marathon last summer on July 28th. Just ask my roommates, I would come home after a morning run brimming because I didn’t feel any pain for 16 miles! Other runs are discouraging like the 12 miles I could hardly finish a week before the NWM. So, I told myself that I’ll just try my best and see how far I’ll get! Surprisingly, I ended up running 22 miles before my IT band flared up. At that point, I couldn’t keep pace anymore since bending my knee in a normal fashion wasn’t going to happen. The good news was that I was only 4.2 miles from the finish line and that Tiffany’s necklace and Nike finishers’ shirt would for sure be mine! After walking, jogging, limping, and skipping to the end, I managed to finish in the top 30%. Although I didn’t reach my goal time, I finished a race I thought I had no chance of surviving.
Think 26.2 miles by itself is a long ways? Now, imagine worrying throughout each and every mile about when your injury will manifest itself. During the first couple miles, I felt stressed because I couldn’t predict when I would start hurting. Would it be mile 4 or mile 24? The possibility of having to drop out was scary too. However, I let go of fear to just enjoy every pain-free mile I could get. With this new attitude, I embraced my surroundings: the beautiful San Francisco coast, funny signs and tee-shirts, and the energy all the runners exuberated. I wasn’t embarrassed to high-five crowd-members, make eye-contact, and cheer people on. I just wanted to make the most out of every step my body would allow. While people-watching, I was reminded of how much love surrounds the sport of running from the recreational to elite levels. I can tell you from my first marathon experience that having loved ones at the finish line gives you tremendous motivation. (This time, I went at the race solo but celebrated with my roomies when I got home!)
Although I love running, and am so proud of myself for keeping up with marathon training while starting medical school, I am definitely looking forward to the next chapter in my fitness life! First and foremost, I’m going to take time to heal properly. Then, I can finally do sports with side-to-side movement again, like tennis, without feeling scared of obtaining an injury that would jeopardize my marathon ambitions. I don’t know when my next marathon will be (maybe Oakland in March), but I learned that when a runner steps to the starting line, he or she doesn’t just bring with them athletic abilities, but the months of life, personal struggle, and breakthroughs that surrounds training.
Geraldine

Nike Women’s Marathon, San Francisco (10-14-12)

The crowds of people, the challenges that lay ahead, the possibility that anything can happen may overwhelm an amateur runner as she enters her start carrel. However, once you start running, you realize that this race is ultimately about you. No one else knows the injuries, the sacrifices, the family issues that you’ve dealt with in order to be present at the starting line on race day. The way I see it, making it to the starting line in one piece is a bigger accomplishment than crossing the finish line. For me, the Nike Women’s Full Marathon (NWM) was not only an athletic win, but also an emotional achievement.

I went into this race without any expectations. My right IT band and knee have been hurting on-and-off since the San Francisco Marathon last summer on July 28th. Just ask my roommates, I would come home after a morning run brimming because I didn’t feel any pain for 16 miles! Other runs are discouraging like the 12 miles I could hardly finish a week before the NWM. So, I told myself that I’ll just try my best and see how far I’ll get! Surprisingly, I ended up running 22 miles before my IT band flared up. At that point, I couldn’t keep pace anymore since bending my knee in a normal fashion wasn’t going to happen. The good news was that I was only 4.2 miles from the finish line and that Tiffany’s necklace and Nike finishers’ shirt would for sure be mine! After walking, jogging, limping, and skipping to the end, I managed to finish in the top 30%. Although I didn’t reach my goal time, I finished a race I thought I had no chance of surviving.

Think 26.2 miles by itself is a long ways? Now, imagine worrying throughout each and every mile about when your injury will manifest itself. During the first couple miles, I felt stressed because I couldn’t predict when I would start hurting. Would it be mile 4 or mile 24? The possibility of having to drop out was scary too. However, I let go of fear to just enjoy every pain-free mile I could get. With this new attitude, I embraced my surroundings: the beautiful San Francisco coast, funny signs and tee-shirts, and the energy all the runners exuberated. I wasn’t embarrassed to high-five crowd-members, make eye-contact, and cheer people on. I just wanted to make the most out of every step my body would allow. While people-watching, I was reminded of how much love surrounds the sport of running from the recreational to elite levels. I can tell you from my first marathon experience that having loved ones at the finish line gives you tremendous motivation. (This time, I went at the race solo but celebrated with my roomies when I got home!)

Although I love running, and am so proud of myself for keeping up with marathon training while starting medical school, I am definitely looking forward to the next chapter in my fitness life! First and foremost, I’m going to take time to heal properly. Then, I can finally do sports with side-to-side movement again, like tennis, without feeling scared of obtaining an injury that would jeopardize my marathon ambitions. I don’t know when my next marathon will be (maybe Oakland in March), but I learned that when a runner steps to the starting line, he or she doesn’t just bring with them athletic abilities, but the months of life, personal struggle, and breakthroughs that surrounds training.

Geraldine

Filed under running nike NWM marathon fitness personal reflection

24 notes

After finishing the NMW Full Marathon, I got to meet other beautiful runners and hear their experience! A group of girls from UC Berkeley shared with me their struggles and strategies to reach their goal. Although the hills were hard and the race was long, they kept telling themselves "mind over matter" and kept running since they knew they would lose motivation if they stopped for too long. 

I can’t think of anything more fun than running a race with a group of your friends! It’s such an experience…the early morning, the start, racing, and the of course the finish line! It’s like the ultimate bonding experience!! 

Are you and your friends thinking of running a race too? 

~Geraldine 

P.S. Will blog about my own experience soon! 

Filed under nike running fitness marathon NWM runners

167 notes

Hi everyone! I got new shoes at a specialty running shoe store and picked up a pair of Brooks Adrenaline GTS 12 (kids size 5) along with some tips. I told an employee about how I get black-toenails —> no toenails and he showed me how to properly lace my shoes. Check out my video if you don’t already know! 

This technique keeps your heel in place and prevents your toes from sliding up. Gone are my days of losing toenails! 

Do you already tie your shoes like this?

Love to hear from you!

~Geri 

Filed under fitness running sports brooks how-to

43 notes

…And this is what I’m starting now!
I am registered for the Nike Women’s Marathon on Oct. 14th and chose one of Hal Higdon’s 8 week training schedule. Since I’ll be starting school, I predict that I’ll need a plan that’s more flexible and allows working out around the clock. I also don’t want to be running a lot at night because I’ll be living in a city that’s sketchy after dark. This plan will give me the option of going to the gym (safe even late at night!) more often. 
How I’m making it work for me: 
Monday: no running, more casual walks, cross-training at the gym (cycling, swimming, cardio class, or moderate strength training)
Tuesday: Weight-lifting at gym or BodyPump class (~ 1 hr)
Wednesday:  8-8:30 min/mile pace with University Run Club!
Thursday:  Interval workout on stationary bike, or spinning class, strengthening (~30 min + ~30 min)  
Friday: Easy conversational pace
Saturday: Yoga class, light cross-training, more casual walks
Sunday: Long run day at easy pace
As you can see, I plan to switch some of the days around which the author says is fine. This is not set in stone, and I’ll let you know what I actually decide to do for cross-training days!
Are you starting or following a workout plan too?!
~Geraldine 

…And this is what I’m starting now!

I am registered for the Nike Women’s Marathon on Oct. 14th and chose one of Hal Higdon’s 8 week training schedule. Since I’ll be starting school, I predict that I’ll need a plan that’s more flexible and allows working out around the clock. I also don’t want to be running a lot at night because I’ll be living in a city that’s sketchy after dark. This plan will give me the option of going to the gym (safe even late at night!) more often. 

How I’m making it work for me: 

  • Monday: no running, more casual walks, cross-training at the gym (cycling, swimming, cardio class, or moderate strength training)
  • Tuesday: Weight-lifting at gym or BodyPump class (~ 1 hr)
  • Wednesday:  8-8:30 min/mile pace with University Run Club!
  • Thursday:  Interval workout on stationary bike, or spinning class, strengthening (~30 min + ~30 min)  
  • Friday: Easy conversational pace
  • Saturday: Yoga class, light cross-training, more casual walks
  • Sunday: Long run day at easy pace

As you can see, I plan to switch some of the days around which the author says is fine. This is not set in stone, and I’ll let you know what I actually decide to do for cross-training days!

Are you starting or following a workout plan too?!

~Geraldine 

Filed under running marathon exercise fitness