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Posts tagged research

46 notes

"It turns out that we learn best when new information is linked

to existing information. New information should be maximally

related to what we know already [7]. Loose facts are forgotten

unless we attach meaning to them, even if it is only in the form of

an aid-of-memory. In the area of communication in a medical

school we are fortunate, because students have been communicating

almost 20 years before we see them. They have much

experience, even though they may not be aware of it. We can make

use of this experience, by asking students to demonstrate what

they think is good communication with a patient, either real or a

simulated. When medical students enter our schools, they are

mostly motivated by: caring for people. They are clever and

compassionate people. It makes sense to use that motivation and

that experience and start our communication programme at day

one of medical school.” 

Jan van Dalen, Communication skills in context: Trends and perspectives, Patient Education and Counseling, Available online 27 June 2013, ISSN 0738-3991, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2013.05.020.


I’m doing a project and writing a paper on physician communication and how it affects patient satisfaction and value based purchasing. I came across this article which highlights some interesting points: 

  1. Relate what you want to learn to something you already know. 
  2. Maybe medical schools are looking for students who are good communicators. The interview could be a screening tool to find students who communicate well. 
  3. You never want to say, “I want to be a doctor because I want to help people” in an interview because it’s vague…but it’s the truth. And even experts know it. 

-Geraldine

Filed under medicine medical school research communication learn how do i study better

35 notes

dress like someone you admire to help you emulate them

Why you should dress like Jesus: 

A group of researchers at Northwestern School of Management are studying embodied cognition and found that when undergrads wore a white coat they believed to belong to a doctor, their ability to pay attention significantly increases. But, when they wore the same coat they believed to belong to a painter, there was no effect. They go on to say that people think with more than our brains, but with our bodies too. It’s been long established that people perceive you differently by the way you dress, but they are trying to see how the way you dress affects your basic abilities and your readiness to take on different roles. Since doctors are believed to be good at paying attention and careful, the students acted that way too. Funny quote: 

Clothes invade the body and brain, putting the wearer into a different psychological state, he said. He described his own experience from last Halloween (or maybe it should be called National Enclothed Cognition Day).”

He had decided to dress as a pimp, with a fedora, long coat and cane. “When I entered the room, I glided in,” he said. “I felt a very different presence.”

So I’m just going to go around dressing and pretending I’m Liz Falvey, my awesome modern dance teacher who also teaches yoga. “Try to dance your warm-up!” Or maybe I’ll dress like a Buddhist monk…I may be more mindful of what I do and say. lol like I could be any nicer…jk. (confession: I have to combat my sarcastic nature on my blog). 

Anyone take this seriously and down to dress like their fitness/health role model (or Katniss)? omgod cosplay may have a purpose…

Filed under embodied cognition halloween everyday science psychology northwestern research

25 notes

Things I love about Research #187…nerdy puns 
"Bee"vine Serum from Thermo Scientific: We’d like you to enjoy a complimentary bottle of honey, fresh from the meadows of Cache Valley, Utah. This "Bee" vine Serum, like Thermo Scientific HyClone Bovine Serum is known for its purity. Give into an age old instinct and indulge your sweet tooth with some pure Cache Valley honey. 
Random use for honey: Cure for canker sores and cold sores! Put only on an open sore and it helps ease the pain. My mom taught me this when I used to get a lot of canker sores. 

Things I love about Research #187…nerdy puns 

"Bee"vine Serum from Thermo Scientific: We’d like you to enjoy a complimentary bottle of honey, fresh from the meadows of Cache Valley, Utah. This "Bee" vine Serum, like Thermo Scientific HyClone Bovine Serum is known for its purity. Give into an age old instinct and indulge your sweet tooth with some pure Cache Valley honey. 

Random use for honey: Cure for canker sores and cold sores! Put only on an open sore and it helps ease the pain. My mom taught me this when I used to get a lot of canker sores. 

Filed under food science research thermo scientific honey funny

18 notes

Caffeine is Good for Your Skin
Scientists at Rutgers University show that caffeine applied directly to the skin might help prevent damaging UV light from causing skin cancer. Caffeine acts as an antioxidant and inhibits a protein, ATR, known to promote skin cancer when damaged. Also, it acts as a sunscreen. 
I bought this face wash from Clean and Clear before I read this study and was skeptical because of the added caffeine, but now I’m happy I bought it! 

Caffeine is Good for Your Skin

Scientists at Rutgers University show that caffeine applied directly to the skin might help prevent damaging UV light from causing skin cancer. Caffeine acts as an antioxidant and inhibits a protein, ATR, known to promote skin cancer when damaged. Also, it acts as a sunscreen. 

I bought this face wash from Clean and Clear before I read this study and was skeptical because of the added caffeine, but now I’m happy I bought it! 

Filed under Caffeine research science skin care

10 notes

Birth Control and Weight Gain

Scared of going on birth control because of weight gain? Don’t be! Because recent research at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden shows that hormonal birth control does not directly cause weight gain. The only factors which did were age and smoking.

Changes in hormone levels may cause mood-swings…and many of us lament over a bowl of ice cream to calm down leading to weight gain. However, after a few months, your body should adjust to the changes and you’ll achieve a balance. The first few months can be a little crazy (increase/decrease appetite, moody, acne) but things settle after a few months. If you are sensitive to the pill, I suggest looking into Nuvaring which releases a constant amount of hormones throughout the day making it easier to adapt to. Taking a pill once a day creates peaks and valleys of hormone levels which can throw off your system.  

So don’t stop your birth control unless you want some of these Shrek Babies…

Because you don't want Shrek babies

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110607104927.htm

Filed under birth control research shrek science women's health

32 notes

Antioxidant Spices Reduce Negative Effects of High-Fat Meal (Aug 10, 2011) 
After a fatty meal, triglyercides (fat molecules) are released in your your bloodstream increasing your risk of heart disease. However, researchers from Penn State found that adding spices like tumeric and cinnamon to high-fat meals reduces this phenomenon by ~30%. The experiments compared overweight, but otherwise healthy adults who were separated into one group that ate meals with spices, and another which did not have spices. 
Spices tested because of high antioxidant ( levels:
Rosemary (check!) 
Oregano
Cinnamon (check!)
Tumeric (check!)
Black Pepper (Check!) 
Gloves
Garlic Powder (Check!) 
Paprika (Check!) 
Results
increase in antioxidant activity in the blood by 13% (fighting oxidative stress)
insulin response decreased by 20% (stabilizes blood sugar levels and slower movement of food to fat cells)
See if you can use some of these ingredients in your cooking for meal that not only is healthy, but reduces oxidative stress!
 
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110810101607.htm#.TkdJh4xibm8.email

Antioxidant Spices Reduce Negative Effects of High-Fat Meal (Aug 10, 2011) 

After a fatty meal, triglyercides (fat molecules) are released in your your bloodstream increasing your risk of heart disease. However, researchers from Penn State found that adding spices like tumeric and cinnamon to high-fat meals reduces this phenomenon by ~30%. The experiments compared overweight, but otherwise healthy adults who were separated into one group that ate meals with spices, and another which did not have spices. 

Spices tested because of high antioxidant ( levels:

  • Rosemary (check!) 
  • Oregano
  • Cinnamon (check!)
  • Tumeric (check!)
  • Black Pepper (Check!) 
  • Gloves
  • Garlic Powder (Check!) 
  • Paprika (Check!) 

Results

  • increase in antioxidant activity in the blood by 13% (fighting oxidative stress)
  • insulin response decreased by 20% (stabilizes blood sugar levels and slower movement of food to fat cells)

See if you can use some of these ingredients in your cooking for meal that not only is healthy, but reduces oxidative stress!

 Spices

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110810101607.htm#.TkdJh4xibm8.email

Filed under food spices science research antioxidants nutrition