On the Run: fitness made simple

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Posts tagged marathon

15 notes

Anonymous asked: It's concerning to me that you feel like you need to run a marathon to justify eating a blueberry muffin.

Honestly, I rarely (almost never) eat an entire 400+ calorie muffin…but I like to make lower calorie versions of pumpkin and banana breads when I get a craving! Substituting applesauce for butter is AH-MAZING. Whoever came up with that is a genius. My favorite bread right now is a chocolate-cherry sourdough loaf from a local San Francisco bakery! It’s quite dense, so I try and only have a chunk for dessert and I don’t buy it every week. My goal right now is to not eat like I’m training for a marathon still…I’m always striving for moderation =) Sometimes you just need the real deal though you know?

Also, I wanted to share this message with you all in case anyone was thinking the same thing. I hope not! Don’t worry about me…I’m doing fine health-wise in med school! I’ll try and be more sensitive in my posts, but I tend to be kind of sarcastic and use exaggerations as humor.  

Filed under blogging fitness marathon running diet

30 notes

Got my little blue Tiffany’s box from firefighters at the finish line! Okay so not all of them are hot…But nice that they are volunteering their time! 
I told my roommate who’s thoughtful boyfriend surprised her with a beautiful Tiffany’s bracelet for their anniversary that some girls have to run 26.2 miles for a taste of Tiffany’s haha.

Got my little blue Tiffany’s box from firefighters at the finish line! Okay so not all of them are hot…But nice that they are volunteering their time! 

I told my roommate who’s thoughtful boyfriend surprised her with a beautiful Tiffany’s bracelet for their anniversary that some girls have to run 26.2 miles for a taste of Tiffany’s haha.

Filed under nike running firefighters tiffany's marathon NWM

46 notes

Nike Women’s Marathon, San Francisco (10-14-12)
The crowds of people, the challenges that lay ahead, the possibility that anything can happen may overwhelm an amateur runner as she enters her start carrel. However, once you start running, you realize that this race is ultimately about you. No one else knows the injuries, the sacrifices, the family issues that you’ve dealt with in order to be present at the starting line on race day. The way I see it, making it to the starting line in one piece is a bigger accomplishment than crossing the finish line. For me, the Nike Women’s Full Marathon (NWM) was not only an athletic win, but also an emotional achievement.
I went into this race without any expectations. My right IT band and knee have been hurting on-and-off since the San Francisco Marathon last summer on July 28th. Just ask my roommates, I would come home after a morning run brimming because I didn’t feel any pain for 16 miles! Other runs are discouraging like the 12 miles I could hardly finish a week before the NWM. So, I told myself that I’ll just try my best and see how far I’ll get! Surprisingly, I ended up running 22 miles before my IT band flared up. At that point, I couldn’t keep pace anymore since bending my knee in a normal fashion wasn’t going to happen. The good news was that I was only 4.2 miles from the finish line and that Tiffany’s necklace and Nike finishers’ shirt would for sure be mine! After walking, jogging, limping, and skipping to the end, I managed to finish in the top 30%. Although I didn’t reach my goal time, I finished a race I thought I had no chance of surviving.
Think 26.2 miles by itself is a long ways? Now, imagine worrying throughout each and every mile about when your injury will manifest itself. During the first couple miles, I felt stressed because I couldn’t predict when I would start hurting. Would it be mile 4 or mile 24? The possibility of having to drop out was scary too. However, I let go of fear to just enjoy every pain-free mile I could get. With this new attitude, I embraced my surroundings: the beautiful San Francisco coast, funny signs and tee-shirts, and the energy all the runners exuberated. I wasn’t embarrassed to high-five crowd-members, make eye-contact, and cheer people on. I just wanted to make the most out of every step my body would allow. While people-watching, I was reminded of how much love surrounds the sport of running from the recreational to elite levels. I can tell you from my first marathon experience that having loved ones at the finish line gives you tremendous motivation. (This time, I went at the race solo but celebrated with my roomies when I got home!)
Although I love running, and am so proud of myself for keeping up with marathon training while starting medical school, I am definitely looking forward to the next chapter in my fitness life! First and foremost, I’m going to take time to heal properly. Then, I can finally do sports with side-to-side movement again, like tennis, without feeling scared of obtaining an injury that would jeopardize my marathon ambitions. I don’t know when my next marathon will be (maybe Oakland in March), but I learned that when a runner steps to the starting line, he or she doesn’t just bring with them athletic abilities, but the months of life, personal struggle, and breakthroughs that surrounds training.
Geraldine

Nike Women’s Marathon, San Francisco (10-14-12)

The crowds of people, the challenges that lay ahead, the possibility that anything can happen may overwhelm an amateur runner as she enters her start carrel. However, once you start running, you realize that this race is ultimately about you. No one else knows the injuries, the sacrifices, the family issues that you’ve dealt with in order to be present at the starting line on race day. The way I see it, making it to the starting line in one piece is a bigger accomplishment than crossing the finish line. For me, the Nike Women’s Full Marathon (NWM) was not only an athletic win, but also an emotional achievement.

I went into this race without any expectations. My right IT band and knee have been hurting on-and-off since the San Francisco Marathon last summer on July 28th. Just ask my roommates, I would come home after a morning run brimming because I didn’t feel any pain for 16 miles! Other runs are discouraging like the 12 miles I could hardly finish a week before the NWM. So, I told myself that I’ll just try my best and see how far I’ll get! Surprisingly, I ended up running 22 miles before my IT band flared up. At that point, I couldn’t keep pace anymore since bending my knee in a normal fashion wasn’t going to happen. The good news was that I was only 4.2 miles from the finish line and that Tiffany’s necklace and Nike finishers’ shirt would for sure be mine! After walking, jogging, limping, and skipping to the end, I managed to finish in the top 30%. Although I didn’t reach my goal time, I finished a race I thought I had no chance of surviving.

Think 26.2 miles by itself is a long ways? Now, imagine worrying throughout each and every mile about when your injury will manifest itself. During the first couple miles, I felt stressed because I couldn’t predict when I would start hurting. Would it be mile 4 or mile 24? The possibility of having to drop out was scary too. However, I let go of fear to just enjoy every pain-free mile I could get. With this new attitude, I embraced my surroundings: the beautiful San Francisco coast, funny signs and tee-shirts, and the energy all the runners exuberated. I wasn’t embarrassed to high-five crowd-members, make eye-contact, and cheer people on. I just wanted to make the most out of every step my body would allow. While people-watching, I was reminded of how much love surrounds the sport of running from the recreational to elite levels. I can tell you from my first marathon experience that having loved ones at the finish line gives you tremendous motivation. (This time, I went at the race solo but celebrated with my roomies when I got home!)

Although I love running, and am so proud of myself for keeping up with marathon training while starting medical school, I am definitely looking forward to the next chapter in my fitness life! First and foremost, I’m going to take time to heal properly. Then, I can finally do sports with side-to-side movement again, like tennis, without feeling scared of obtaining an injury that would jeopardize my marathon ambitions. I don’t know when my next marathon will be (maybe Oakland in March), but I learned that when a runner steps to the starting line, he or she doesn’t just bring with them athletic abilities, but the months of life, personal struggle, and breakthroughs that surrounds training.

Geraldine

Filed under running nike NWM marathon fitness personal reflection

24 notes

After finishing the NMW Full Marathon, I got to meet other beautiful runners and hear their experience! A group of girls from UC Berkeley shared with me their struggles and strategies to reach their goal. Although the hills were hard and the race was long, they kept telling themselves "mind over matter" and kept running since they knew they would lose motivation if they stopped for too long. 

I can’t think of anything more fun than running a race with a group of your friends! It’s such an experience…the early morning, the start, racing, and the of course the finish line! It’s like the ultimate bonding experience!! 

Are you and your friends thinking of running a race too? 

~Geraldine 

P.S. Will blog about my own experience soon! 

Filed under nike running fitness marathon NWM runners

43 notes

…And this is what I’m starting now!
I am registered for the Nike Women’s Marathon on Oct. 14th and chose one of Hal Higdon’s 8 week training schedule. Since I’ll be starting school, I predict that I’ll need a plan that’s more flexible and allows working out around the clock. I also don’t want to be running a lot at night because I’ll be living in a city that’s sketchy after dark. This plan will give me the option of going to the gym (safe even late at night!) more often. 
How I’m making it work for me: 
Monday: no running, more casual walks, cross-training at the gym (cycling, swimming, cardio class, or moderate strength training)
Tuesday: Weight-lifting at gym or BodyPump class (~ 1 hr)
Wednesday:  8-8:30 min/mile pace with University Run Club!
Thursday:  Interval workout on stationary bike, or spinning class, strengthening (~30 min + ~30 min)  
Friday: Easy conversational pace
Saturday: Yoga class, light cross-training, more casual walks
Sunday: Long run day at easy pace
As you can see, I plan to switch some of the days around which the author says is fine. This is not set in stone, and I’ll let you know what I actually decide to do for cross-training days!
Are you starting or following a workout plan too?!
~Geraldine 

…And this is what I’m starting now!

I am registered for the Nike Women’s Marathon on Oct. 14th and chose one of Hal Higdon’s 8 week training schedule. Since I’ll be starting school, I predict that I’ll need a plan that’s more flexible and allows working out around the clock. I also don’t want to be running a lot at night because I’ll be living in a city that’s sketchy after dark. This plan will give me the option of going to the gym (safe even late at night!) more often. 

How I’m making it work for me: 

  • Monday: no running, more casual walks, cross-training at the gym (cycling, swimming, cardio class, or moderate strength training)
  • Tuesday: Weight-lifting at gym or BodyPump class (~ 1 hr)
  • Wednesday:  8-8:30 min/mile pace with University Run Club!
  • Thursday:  Interval workout on stationary bike, or spinning class, strengthening (~30 min + ~30 min)  
  • Friday: Easy conversational pace
  • Saturday: Yoga class, light cross-training, more casual walks
  • Sunday: Long run day at easy pace

As you can see, I plan to switch some of the days around which the author says is fine. This is not set in stone, and I’ll let you know what I actually decide to do for cross-training days!

Are you starting or following a workout plan too?!

~Geraldine 

Filed under running marathon exercise fitness

51 notes

Hi Everyone!
This was the Marathon Training Schedule I followed. It’s for people who have a solid base of running. I thought it was very doable because I hardly ever felt wiped out. It’s hard to eat moderately and to make healthy choices when you’re exercising a lot. However the rest days, short run days, and cross training days help keep you from feeling exhausted and binge-eating. I did not do a lot of strength and speed training while training for my marathon because I didn’t want to get too tired. But, I did a lot of yoga, abdominal work, and dance. Also, I made sure to include hill runs every week! Check out Hal Higdon’s website for more plans and advice. He has beginner, intermediate, and advanced plans! He’s a well-known author and prominent running expert. 
Anyone interested in training for a race this year?!
-Geraldine 

Hi Everyone!

This was the Marathon Training Schedule I followed. It’s for people who have a solid base of running. I thought it was very doable because I hardly ever felt wiped out. It’s hard to eat moderately and to make healthy choices when you’re exercising a lot. However the rest days, short run days, and cross training days help keep you from feeling exhausted and binge-eating. I did not do a lot of strength and speed training while training for my marathon because I didn’t want to get too tired. But, I did a lot of yoga, abdominal work, and dance. Also, I made sure to include hill runs every week! Check out Hal Higdon’s website for more plans and advice. He has beginner, intermediate, and advanced plans! He’s a well-known author and prominent running expert. 

Anyone interested in training for a race this year?!

-Geraldine 

Filed under running marathon fitness exercise sport

10 notes

Thank you everyone on tumblr for helping me get here! When I was feeling discouraged, I thought about how you all have faced challenges reaching your fitness goals and how you’ve found ways to work through them. I knew then I just had to relax and keep going! I hope we can continue to motivate each other!! xoxo Geri 

Thank you everyone on tumblr for helping me get here! When I was feeling discouraged, I thought about how you all have faced challenges reaching your fitness goals and how you’ve found ways to work through them. I knew then I just had to relax and keep going! I hope we can continue to motivate each other!! xoxo Geri 

Filed under running fitness tumblr san francisco SFmarathon marathon love

25 notes

After foiled plans for a March marathon, I finally made it in one piece to the starting line on July 29th, 2012! Can you see me in the first picture? (hint: shortest one in the front). It was kind of embarrassing; the announcer asked us how many of us were first-time marathoners. I was the only one in the front row to raise my hand. Everyone around me looked like seasoned racers… But honestly, I just wanted to be in the front so I could see my mom and have pictures taken LOL. So this was basically how my race went:
Miles 1-13: I started off faster than I intended too partly due to nerves and partly due to how fast the other runners were going. I used the restroom at the first aid station, which was a hard decision for me. Then around mile 4, I started to panic because I felt a sharp pain shoot up my foot and ankle.  It was bad. I started to worry that I’d have to drop out now and go home. I thought of how disappointed my mom would be and my relatives’ sad faces…However, it wasn’t an unfamiliar pain. I’ve felt it before on a long during which I overcame the sensation. I stopped, walked, stretched my calves, flexed my foot, and tried to run again. The pain didn’t go away! I applied what I had just learned about proper running form. Stand upright and lean slightly forward. This helped by minimizing heel-striking and encouraging a mid-foot strike. However, I did have to run more on the ball of my foot than I’m used to for the entire race which is why my calves are currently tight masses of fury right now. We ran across the Golden Gate Bridge during miles 6-9 which was pretty neat (except we were so squished and couldn’t  get around people).  The first half went by really fast!.
Miles 13-20:  I started getting a little fatigued and was still running partially on the balls of my feet to avoid tweaking my foot and ankle. I just kept thinking about getting to the next aid station, seeing my family at the end, and staying strong. Throughout the race, people were mostly passing me, but by now I found my people! I was fighting negative thoughts during this time, but the bubbly, happy thoughts prevailed. I was kind of bummed that I wouldn’t make it in under 4 hours like I had hoped.
Miles 20-25: This was the point when I really felt like I was running a marathon.  Everyone says the last 6.2 miles are the worst…but it didn’t feel that way to me. I was so excited to break new ground! This was the real deal now! After mile 23, I wanted to speed up, but I couldn’t lift my legs any higher. My hip flexors were so sore. I realized that everyone was in pain at this point, so I wasn’t a special and weak case. I was so happy and excited to reach mile 25 because at this point, I was for sure going to make it across the finish line…even if I had to walk!
Miles 26.2: They weren’t lying. There really is an end! The announcer called out my name as I ran across the finish line and I met up with my family! It really was a beautiful and proud moment for me. The best feeling was the release of all the stress from worrying about pulling a muscle or hurting my foot. I was really worried about getting injured throughout the race. Also, I thought, “Hey, that actually wasn’t as fun as I thought it’d be…” I think I was too stressed about my foot spazzing again to really enjoy the run. But wow, I can’t believe I finished! My time was 4:09 (9:30 min/mile)!  After a year of planning, sustaining injuries, training on and off, fixing eating habits, and 3 consistent months of running…I ran a marathon!!!
Thank you sooo much to my parents and cousins who tried hard and came to San Francisco with me!  They gave me so much motivation and energy.  
The best advice I can give is to treat each mile like a new adventure. 
Pictures: The starting line at 5:50 am, close up of me (and who’d I look like if I was a guy), water show around the Bay Bridge, me running up to the finish line, my parents and I after the race, my cousins and me at brunch! 
Much love,
Geraldine 

After foiled plans for a March marathon, I finally made it in one piece to the starting line on July 29th, 2012! Can you see me in the first picture? (hint: shortest one in the front). It was kind of embarrassing; the announcer asked us how many of us were first-time marathoners. I was the only one in the front row to raise my hand. Everyone around me looked like seasoned racers… But honestly, I just wanted to be in the front so I could see my mom and have pictures taken LOL. So this was basically how my race went:

Miles 1-13: I started off faster than I intended too partly due to nerves and partly due to how fast the other runners were going. I used the restroom at the first aid station, which was a hard decision for me. Then around mile 4, I started to panic because I felt a sharp pain shoot up my foot and ankle.  It was bad. I started to worry that I’d have to drop out now and go home. I thought of how disappointed my mom would be and my relatives’ sad faces…However, it wasn’t an unfamiliar pain. I’ve felt it before on a long during which I overcame the sensation. I stopped, walked, stretched my calves, flexed my foot, and tried to run again. The pain didn’t go away! I applied what I had just learned about proper running form. Stand upright and lean slightly forward. This helped by minimizing heel-striking and encouraging a mid-foot strike. However, I did have to run more on the ball of my foot than I’m used to for the entire race which is why my calves are currently tight masses of fury right now. We ran across the Golden Gate Bridge during miles 6-9 which was pretty neat (except we were so squished and couldn’t  get around people).  The first half went by really fast!.

Miles 13-20:  I started getting a little fatigued and was still running partially on the balls of my feet to avoid tweaking my foot and ankle. I just kept thinking about getting to the next aid station, seeing my family at the end, and staying strong. Throughout the race, people were mostly passing me, but by now I found my people! I was fighting negative thoughts during this time, but the bubbly, happy thoughts prevailed. I was kind of bummed that I wouldn’t make it in under 4 hours like I had hoped.

Miles 20-25: This was the point when I really felt like I was running a marathon.  Everyone says the last 6.2 miles are the worst…but it didn’t feel that way to me. I was so excited to break new ground! This was the real deal now! After mile 23, I wanted to speed up, but I couldn’t lift my legs any higher. My hip flexors were so sore. I realized that everyone was in pain at this point, so I wasn’t a special and weak case. I was so happy and excited to reach mile 25 because at this point, I was for sure going to make it across the finish line…even if I had to walk!

Miles 26.2: They weren’t lying. There really is an end! The announcer called out my name as I ran across the finish line and I met up with my family! It really was a beautiful and proud moment for me. The best feeling was the release of all the stress from worrying about pulling a muscle or hurting my foot. I was really worried about getting injured throughout the race. Also, I thought, “Hey, that actually wasn’t as fun as I thought it’d be…” I think I was too stressed about my foot spazzing again to really enjoy the run. But wow, I can’t believe I finished! My time was 4:09 (9:30 min/mile)!  After a year of planning, sustaining injuries, training on and off, fixing eating habits, and 3 consistent months of running…I ran a marathon!!!

Thank you sooo much to my parents and cousins who tried hard and came to San Francisco with me!  They gave me so much motivation and energy.  

The best advice I can give is to treat each mile like a new adventure

Pictures: The starting line at 5:50 am, close up of me (and who’d I look like if I was a guy), water show around the Bay Bridge, me running up to the finish line, my parents and I after the race, my cousins and me at brunch! 

Much love,

Geraldine 

Filed under fitness marathon running san francisco sfmarathon sport summer personal GPOY

9 notes

Hi everyone! I ran my first marathon yesterday and it was an amazing experience! (Don’t get me wrong though; it wasn’t exactly 26.2 miles of bliss…) The fun started off on Saturday, a day before the race, at the Expo. On the way to the Expo, I met two other runners and we walked there together. One young lady helped calm my nerves and ease my fears by telling me about her first marathon experience. The other person was a grad student who shared a bit of his story and tips. I later found out that his young man won 3rd in his age group! I felt so embarrassed after I saw the list of winners because I remembered talking nonsense to him like, “Oh maybe I’ll see you at the end! :D”…He was like, “…we’ll see” haha oh dear I am so awkward! Anyways I didn’t stay at the Expo long, but I got to see a few interesting things:
People demonstrating “The Stick” massager.
Raw food samples.
So Delicious and Amy’s food
Lara bars: Cashew Cookie was my favorite flavor and it’s only made of cashews and dates! You can totally make this at home.
Zinc Coconut water: The product in larger paper containers tastes good and it’s NOT from concentrate. The bottled ones are NASTY and from concentrated juice. These are undrinkable. They gave use bottled Zinc after the race and it tasted like metal. 
More about my actual race experience next! 

Hi everyone! I ran my first marathon yesterday and it was an amazing experience! (Don’t get me wrong though; it wasn’t exactly 26.2 miles of bliss…) The fun started off on Saturday, a day before the race, at the Expo. On the way to the Expo, I met two other runners and we walked there together. One young lady helped calm my nerves and ease my fears by telling me about her first marathon experience. The other person was a grad student who shared a bit of his story and tips. I later found out that his young man won 3rd in his age group! I felt so embarrassed after I saw the list of winners because I remembered talking nonsense to him like, “Oh maybe I’ll see you at the end! :D”…He was like, “…we’ll see” haha oh dear I am so awkward! Anyways I didn’t stay at the Expo long, but I got to see a few interesting things:

  • People demonstrating “The Stick” massager.
  • Raw food samples.
  • So Delicious and Amy’s food
  • Lara bars: Cashew Cookie was my favorite flavor and it’s only made of cashews and dates! You can totally make this at home.
  • Zinc Coconut water: The product in larger paper containers tastes good and it’s NOT from concentrate. The bottled ones are NASTY and from concentrated juice. These are undrinkable. They gave use bottled Zinc after the race and it tasted like metal. 

More about my actual race experience next! 

Filed under sfmarathon running wipro marathon expo san francisco

29 notes

I finished my first 20 mile run 2 weeks ago. I was pretty nervous so I just ran a 4-mile loop 5x. My main concern was finishing without any injuries so I was running 60-90 seconds slower than my intended race pace. This weekend will be my second 20-miler >.Instagram)

I finished my first 20 mile run 2 weeks ago. I was pretty nervous so I just ran a 4-mile loop 5x. My main concern was finishing without any injuries so I was running 60-90 seconds slower than my intended race pace. This weekend will be my second 20-miler >.Instagram)

Filed under running sfmarathon marathon fitness

19 notes

Registration for drawing opens April 9-20th! This is my little reminder to sign up next week =) The race is on October 14, 2012 so there’s plenty of time for ANYONE to train! ( i can haz tiffany’s finisher necklace?) 

Filed under nike running marathon nike womens